January, 2013

TAEM Attends the Northern Virginia Astronomy Club Meeting at GMU in January!

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

NOVAC - Northern Virginia Astronomy ClubThe Arts and Entertainment Magazine attended the Northern Virginia Astronomy Club’s meet at George mason University for their January meeting. Many of the club’s members were there, along with its new president, Phil Wherry and Vice-President Alexander Rogee. Representing GMU was Dr. Harold Geller, the university’s liaison.

NOVAC’s guest speaker for the event was Professor Gideon Bass who lectured on the topic of ‘Kepler Studies of Low-Mass Eclipsing Binaries’. This was of interest to many of the professional and amateur astronomers who attended the conference. You can find our interview with Professor Bass, and details about the subject, in the Science section of this month’s issue. (more…)

TAEM interview of Dr. Liang-Shih Fan of Ohio State University

Thursday, January 31st, 2013
Dr. Liang-Shih Fan

Dr. Liang-Shih Fan

TAEM- The Arts and Entertainment Magazine has recently included a Science section for the interest of many of the students who read our publication and use it as a learning tool for their careers. We have thus far posed questions to astronomers, mathematicians, and physicists and would like to introduce the subject of Chemical Engineering.

   We are very honored to be able to interview Dr. Liang-Shih Fan of Ohio State University. Dr. Fan has received many accolades for his work and research in the field of chemical engineering. Dr. Fan, please tell all of our student readers about your educational background.

LSF- I studied Chemical Engineering in Taiwan at National Taiwan University. Then I came to the United States to obtain my masters and doctorate at West Virginia University where I studied fluidization and flue gas cleaning from coal combustion. Then I went to Kansas State University for my post-doctoral studies and received my masters in Statistics. After that I started my academic career at Ohio State focusing on multiphase flows and fossil fuel conversion and environmental solutions. Much of my research is rooted in chemical engineering fundamentals such as understanding particle science and technology that can solve real-world energy and pollution problems. (more…)

TAEM interview with Professor Gideon Bass of GMU

Thursday, January 31st, 2013
Professor Gideon Bass

Professor Gideon Bass
Photo Credit: Larry Kravitz

     TAEM- This past month The Arts and Entertainment Magazine was fortunate to meet Professor Gideon Bass who was the guest speaker at the monthly meeting for the Northern Virginia Astronomy Club. The meeting was held at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

Professor, please tell our student readers about your educational background.

GB- Well, my undergraduate degree was in astronomy and computer science at Hampshire College, a small experimental liberal arts school in Western Massachusetts. After graduation, I went to San Diego State University where I got a Masters degree in astronomy. And now I am currently in my second year at George Mason University, getting a PhD in their physics program, with a concentration in astronomy.

TAEM- Please tell us about the courses that you teach at George Mason University and what made you interested in the subject of Astronomy.

GB- I actually teach at Northern Virginia Community College, at the Annandale Campus as an adjunct professor. I am teaching their entry level astronomy class, and to me teaching is one of the greatest parts of being an academic, you can make direct changes in other people’s lives. Teaching astronomy is a great opportunity to expose students to ideas about critical thinking, the scientific method, and introducing them to what we know about the nature of the universe itself. It’s great fun. (more…)

“The Butcher” by guest author David Rhodes

Thursday, January 31st, 2013
Guest Author David Rhodes

Guest Author David Rhodes

The body laid in the bathtub, not draining much fluid for it had been dead for a while. It dripped slowly, not really enough to make any kind of difference, except it fascinated him to sit and watch while he engaged in one-sided discourse.

“You were a very bad girl!” he said. “Don’t you know what kind of diseases you might be spreading around?”

The night before buckets of rain fell, and now the glowing sun and warm temperatures were drying up everything. He turned on the cooler, and the apartment soon grew comfortable.

Now it was time for The Butcher to do his job. On the floor next to the tub was a clean hacksaw and a keystone saw. He lay plastic on the bathroom floor, and tossed his tools into the tub against the bloating body. He donned his clean, plastic overalls and stood over the corpse for a while, absorbing the satisfaction, the joy he felt that one more lay there, the indentations pressed deeply into her neck from the cord he had used to strangle life the life from her. (more…)

“Fear of the Full Moon” by guest author Andy Kirk

Thursday, January 31st, 2013
Guest Author Andy Kirk

Guest Author Andy Kirk

The trees at the edge of the lake sway in the gentle breeze, and the bloated, yellow moon that rises from behind seems to be almost taunting me as it silently signifies that yet another month has passed. Once again, it is time.

It always starts the same way: the hot flushes producing a light sheen of moisture; the strange tingling sensation that spreads across my skin, which in turn causes every hair on my body to stand on end. Then I know the transformation has begun.

I can feel my heart pulsate; gently at first, but soon pounding, sending the blood surging around my body until finally it feels as though it will explode at any minute.

My skin suddenly feels as though lava is running beneath it, and then the muscle cramps begin; sudden spasmodic contractions of excruciating pain that flow through my body for several long minutes. And just as the spasms start to subside, there comes another, new, even more intense pain that tears down my spine. I feel every vertebrae stretching and shifting, my back snapping in two as it arches over and moulds into its final position. I cry out in agony. (more…)

TAEM News Flash- Dr. Harold Geller has written a new Book!

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

aCancerStory13528066cover   The Arts and Entertainment Magazine has learned that George Mason University’s Harold Geller has just published another book. The title of the book is A Cancer Story- Along the Road to Death.

The book is based on Harold Geller’s brother, Richard B. Geller, and his fight against Metastasized Malignant Melanoma. It is a compelling story about his fight for life and of the man suffering from this illness. Richard was a brilliant mathematician and his story is worth being told. Harold wanted to write about his brother’s struggle and wished to use it to aid others suffering from this deadly disease. (more…)

TAEM interview with Music Composer Pinar Toprak

Monday, January 14th, 2013

TAEM- This month The Arts and Entertainment Magazine has been very fortunate to be able interview the most renowned people in the fields of Science, Literature, and Music. We ‘d like to present Television and Movie music composer Pinar Toprak to all of our readers. Music is one of the leading attractions of moviegoers and can either make or break a great film. Pinar has enhanced some of the great films today with her fine quality of music composition. Pinar, please tell the many students of the arts, who follow our publication, of your early education and training in music in your native country, Turkey.

PT- I started my music education studying violin at a very traditional conservatory at the age of 5 in Istanbul. Although I love writing for it now, I didn’t like playing it. :) I went on to classical guitar and got my degree in it. Throughout my studies there I also studied piano, voice, as well as composition. (more…)

TAEM Interview with Dr. Kirk Borne of George Mason University

Monday, January 14th, 2013

TAEM- The Arts and Entertainment’ Magazine’s publisher, Joseph J. O’Donnell, issued a challenge in the December 15th issue of our publication to start a ‘grass roots movement’ to support NASA. This support is spreading over the academic world and its start has taken place in the George Mason University faculty and student body. The challenge has centered on not only on Support of NASA, but to give the agency ideas for space exploration for its future programs.

   Dr. Kirk Borne, of GMU, is a Data Scientist and Astrophysicist, and is one of the many professors from the school that has stepped forward to offer insights into what can be achieved. Professor Borne, please tell our readers about your educational training for your fields.

KB- My undergraduate B.S. degree was in Physics at Louisiana State University, with a lot of math and some astronomy.  My goal was to study astronomy in graduate school, so the math and physics coursework was essential.  I loved all of those topics, and astronomy gave me the opportunity to study them all. I went to graduate school at Caltech, receiving a PhD in astronomy in 1983. I studied under some of the great astronomers of that era. It was a fantastic experience. In the years since then, I worked on NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope project for 10 years and at NASA’s Astronomy Data Center within the Space Science Data Operations Office at the Goddard Space Flight Center for another 10 years, and I have now been at George Mason University since 2003.  All of my research and my work experiences at NASA always involved working with scientific data – this led me to the field of Data Science, which is the application of data methods and algorithms to the study of any discipline. (more…)

The Scientific Revolution- by author Joseph O’Donnell IV

Monday, January 14th, 2013
Joe O'Donnell, Jr.

Joe O’Donnell, Jr.

‘The Scientific Revolution’ was by no means a swift and radical change in thoughts pertaining to science. The name applies to a period lasting from the end of the Renaissance and continued through the 18th Century. The later period was referred to as ‘The Enlightenment’.

Although the exact dates are in dispute, there were many notable figures that contributed to it. Among these were Galen, Ptolemy, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. The work contributed to it was no single science, but science as a whole. It included mathematics, physics, astronomy, biology, medicine, and chemistry. From the theories expressed by those great men, mankind’s knowledge of science was born and the world was seen in a revolutionary new view. Religion, superstition, and fear were replaced by reason and knowledge. (more…)

“Comparing Ancient Architecture” by Joseph O’Donnell

Monday, January 14th, 2013
Joe O'Donnell, Jr.

Joe O’Donnell, Jr.

For my essay I will be comparing ancient architecture of western world to revival architecture in United States of American. It is true that some of our founding fathers had traveled aboard and brought back reflections of what they had seen. This evident in the monuments and the government build across the country. Some of the most powerful examples can be seen right here in the nation’s capital, of Washington, D.C.

The Washington Monument is the city’s focal point of all the monuments that decorate the capital. Its design is based on Egyptian obelisks that were found throughout that country. The building height requirements in the capital district state that no building can be taller then twelve stories, so as not to obstruct the view of this important land mark. A fine comparison of this is the obelisk erected to Thutmose III, who ruled Egypt from 1479 to 1425. This monument was transported to Constantinople by emperor Theodosius I in 390. The similarities between this and Washington Monument is strikingly obvious.  The Egyptian obelisk is made out of stone, while the George Washington Monument is made out of Marble. The Obelisk of Theodosius stands today at 19.5 meters or 63.97638 feet, while the George Washington Monument stands at 555 feet 5 1/8 inches. (more…)

TAEM- Waiting For the Washington Capitals

Monday, January 14th, 2013

    The Arts and Entertainment Magazine recently sent our paperwork and credentials in to The Washington Capitals hockey team to cover their games. We also hope to have interviews with the players and team owners. We started biting our nails when we found out that the NHL and team player representatives reached an impasse on labor negotiations and contracts. This led to the current ‘lockout’ which put a halt on this season.

News is now filtering out that there may be hope after all, and that players and judges were told to ‘get ready’. There may also be plans in the works to create a 48-game season. This is great news, and not unlike the recent financial ‘fiscal cliff’ we have all been left chomping on the bit. (more…)

TAEM Interview with Maestro Barry Araujo Kolman

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013
Maestro Barry Araujo Kolman

Maestro Barry Araujo Kolman

TAEM- The Arts and Entertainment Magazine has become all things to all people, and concentrates on revealing information for students at all levels. One of our favorite subjects is music, and we are very fortunate to be able to introduce Maestro Barry Araujo Kolman to all of our readers. Maestro, please tell our readers about your musical education and background.

BAK-  First of all, thank you for that nice introduction. I am thrilled to be interviewed by your magazine.

I knew I loved music when I was as young as 9 or 10 years old. I took up the clarinet when I was in 5th grade and decided then that I wanted to be a musician. I love to perform even at that early age but when I was 15 years old, I was already giving clarinet lessons at the corner music story in Brooklyn, New York. So I was also bitten by the teaching bug. At Midwood High School I played in the Band and the Orchestra. One of our most famous alumni was Woody Allen who went to Midwood when he was living in Brooklyn. From Midwood, I received a New York Regents Scholarship to attend the Crane School of Music in Potsdam, NY, one of the best music education schools in the country. There I received a good dose of teaching methods but I still kept up with the clarinet. At that time, I was studying with David Weber, principal clarinet with the New York City Ballet Orchestra. He was a big influence in my musical life. Armed with a Bachelor in Music in Music Education degree, I taught in the public schools for a while but still wanted to fulfill a dream of mine; to study with Karl Leister of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. I received a Fellowship to travel to Germany and work with Leister. It was my first time I was out of the country and really loved the experience. (more…)

TAEM News Flash- George Mason University Team Searching for Exoplanets!

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

This past month we interviewed Dr. Michael Summers from George Mason University located on the campus in Fairfax, Virginia. Our publisher also offered a challenge to the academic world to help support NASA after another media outlet stated that they seemed to be ‘Lost In Space’. This came about after a report stated that NASA has no set goals for future space exploration. George Mason University is the first college to answer the call !

Dr. Summers has a team put together and they are searching for Exoplanets. An extrasolar planet, or exoplanet, is a planet outside the Solar System. A total of 853 such planets (in 672 planetary systems, including 126 multiple planetary systems) have been identified as of December 1, 2012, all of them within the Milky Way galaxy. It is expected that there are many billions of planets in the Milky Way galaxy, not only occurring around stars but also as free-floating planetary-mass bodies The nearest known exoplanet is Alpha Centauri Bb. (more…)

TAEM interview with Dr. Clifford V. Johnson of USC

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

 

Dr. Clifford V. Johnson

Photo Credit: Dr. Clifford V. Johnson

TAEM- The Arts and Entertainment Magazine has recently expanded to include a ‘Science section’ in our publication for all the students who follow us. We recently began by introducing schools on the East Coast and would now like to travel across country to California.

We’d like to introduce Dr. Clifford V. Johnson to all our readers. Dr. Johnson is an English theoretical physicist and professor at the University of Southern California. Clifford, please tell us of your educational background and the schools in England that you attended.

CVJ- Hi! For my undergraduate degree (BSc) I went to Imperial College, part of London University, in Central London. I did my PhD at Southampton University, in the South of England. (more…)

TAEM Interview with Dr. Mark R. Morris of UCLA

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013
Prof. Mark Morris

Prof. Mark Morris

TAEM- The Arts and Entertainment Magazine had recently added a Science section to our publication to add to the subjects that interests many of the college students who follow our magazine. In addition to the articles produced from George Mason University, who became first to offer interviews and articles, we will present articles from USC and UCLA in this issue.

We are highly honored to present Dr. Mark R. Morris of UCLA to all our readers. Dr. Morris, please tell our readers about your educational background.

MRM- Hello, I’m happy to tell you and your readers about my work.  I was trained in physics through my PhD, first at the University of California at Riverside for my BA, and then at the University of Chicago.  Although I had a few courses in astrophysics, I learned most of what I know about astronomy “on the streets”, or simply by reading, or by being assigned to teach it.  (more…)

TAEM interview with author Michael J. McCann

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013
Author Michael J. McCann

Author Michael J. McCann

TAEM- The Arts and Entertainment Magazine has its base in the literary world, and in writings centered on mystery and crime. One of the great joys that we have is to be able to introduce a renowned writer from that genre to all of our readers. Our northern neighbor, Canada, has been the source of many of the great writers, and entertainers for that matter, that we have presented to our readers in our past. Author Michael J. McCann is another example of the talent that lives just north of our country’s border.

Michael, please tell our many readers about where you live and the beautiful countryside that you view everyday.

MJM- I live just outside Oxford Station, Ontario, which is a little crossroads about forty miles south of Ottawa, our nation’s capital. Our property totals seven acres in the Limerick Forest. I’ve cut a few walking trails behind our house, and in the afternoon when the weather’s good I love to take my border collie for a walk through the woods after I’ve finished writing for the day. It’s very relaxing and helps to clear my head. In the summer I often smoke a cigar on these walks, as it helps keep away the ninety billion mosquitoes who also enjoy the property! (more…)